Ficus macrophylla, Wingham Brush Nature Reserve

We’ve driven past Wingham Brush Nature Reserve lots of times and never had the time to look around. So last long weekend, on our way home from the north coast we decided to stop in. The reserve is a sad relic of the rainforest that once grew in the area before being cleared for farmland. You can walk around the board walk paths in about 15 minutes. Well worth a look if you’re ever around the area and it is one of the few places you can still see a rainforest grown Moreton Bay Fig.

When you hear people say that the Moreton figs growing on farms were left by the farmers when clearing, you can easily tell if that’s the case; rainforest trees won’t start branching until they reach the canopy, around 25 m from the ground. Any farm figs that branch close to the ground were likely planted by farmers for shade and fodder. The botanic gardens back in the day use to suggest growing Moreton Bay figs for fodder and you can often see any leaves with in reach of the cows have been mowed leaving a flat bottom to the tree’s branches.

Here’s some pictures our friend Daphne Zhou took while we were in the Reserve.

Ficus macrophylla, Wingham Brush Nature Reserve.
Ficus macrophylla, Wingham Brush Nature Reserve.

Ficus macrophylla, Wingham Brush Nature Reserve.

https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/wingham-brush-nature-reserve

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